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Hearing Loss in Elderly Linked to Dementia

Over the past forty years the greatest joy of our business is providing the gift of better hearing. Difficulty hearing is one of the most common conditions among older adults. Many people make lifestyle adjustments rather than seek help. With the new advances in technology now is an ideal time to consider an evaluation. At Hopco Hearing Center, we have made a commitment to professional service, quality products and low prices. Here are some factors to keep in mind:

Choice - There are over 200 manufacturers we can service. Everyone's hearing loss and lifestyle is different... So we offer a wide variety.

Follow-up - All aids come with a 60 day trial... We see you weekly during this time to assure your adjustments and the aids adjustment are satisfactory.

Continued Education - Every year we attend conventions and manufacturer seminars to keep up the latest fitting news and technology. We are members of nationally accredited American Speech and Hearing Association, American Academy of Audiologists and the International Hearing Society.

The risk of dementia is increased for older adults with hearing loss, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Hilary R. Davies, PhD, from University College London, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study involving adults aged 50 years and older to examine the correlation between hearing loss and incident physician-diagnosed dementia. Cross-sectional associations were assessed between self-reported (7865 participants) and objective hearing measures (6902 participants) and dementia. The longitudinal association was modeling for self-reported hearing in 2004/2005 and cumulative physician-diagnosed dementia in 2014/2015.

The researchers found that in cross-sectional analyses, participants with self-reported or objective moderate and poor hearing were more likely to have a dementia diagnosis than those with normal hearing, after adjustment for potential confounders (self-reported: odds ratios, 1.6 and 2.6 for moderate and poor hearing, respectively; objective: odds ratios, 1.6 and 4.4 for moderate and poor hearing, respectively). The hazard of developing dementia was 1.4 and 1.6 times as high in individuals who reported moderate and poor hearing, respectively, in longitudinal associations.

"These findings are consistent with the rationale that correction of hearing loss could help delay the onset of dementia, or that hearing loss itself could serve as a risk indicator for cognitive decline," the authors wrote.